Is exercise safe for the older population?

You may believe exercise is only for younger people, but think again!

Dr Nick Cavill, a NHS health-promotion consultant says “As people get older and their bodies decline in function, physical activity helps to slow that decline. It’s important they remain active or even increase their activity as they get older.”

So how much exercise should you do?

The recommendation is 150 minutes of moderate exercise every week. This can be completed over a number of days; for instance 10-15 minutes each morning and 10-15 minutes each evening or 30 minutes of activity 5 days a week, will certainly make sure you are reaching the recommendation.

What is moderate exercise?

You need to do an activity that makes your body work a little harder without it being painful or causing you to become too out of breath. You should always be able to maintain a conversation while exercising.

The amount and type of activity will vary dependant on your individual circumstances. Always choose exercises that you feel confident to do safely. As you exercise more, you’ll be able to do more. Always build up slowly and be patient, you’ll gradually see improvements in your general wellbeing as you continue to be active. If in doubt always seek professional medical advice before starting any new activities.

What exercise is suitable?

Ideally, try to do a mixture of activities to help improve your strength, balance and flexibility plus gentle aerobic activity to work your heart, lungs and circulatory system.

Walking is an excellent activity for all levels, include a few of our online WellBalanced exercises to work on your strength and balance and you’ll certainly notice a difference in no time!

Other recommended activities include Yoga, Pilates, Dancing, Tai Chi, Playing Tennis, Golf or Bowls and Swimming. Walking football and Walking Netball have become popular sports for older people, check with your local leisure centre or Wellbeing service to see what is available in your area.

AHS Wellbeing Online offers a range of classes for older people, including;

  • Chair Based Pilates
  • Body Maintenance- Movement, Strength & Stretch
  • Pilates for the absolute beginner (mat based)
  • Stretch Classes with Susie
  • WellBalanced Classes

Visit our home page to find out more

AHS Wellbeing Online Coming Soon!

We have brought together our network of Fitness Professionals and Wellbeing Experts to offer a brand new online service that will launch in June 2020.

AHS Wellbeing Online will provide exciting new options to keep active, fit and well, both in the home during in the current COVID-19 crisis and in the community, once current restrictions allow.

Our service is specifically designed for:

  • Those new to exercise looking for a gentle way to start being more active
  • For people living with health conditions that can be managed with the right type of exercise
  • People who have been advised by a health professional to increase their activity
  • Older people wishing to keep fit and well
  • Anyone wishing to improve their general health, fitness and wellbeing in a supportive environment

We are looking for Health & Fitness Professionals who are passionate about improving the Health & Wellbeing of our customers. If that’s you, get in touch today to see how you can get involved.

Active House Solutions helping to “Raise the bar on Strength and Balance”

Risk of falling is an inevitable part of ageing, with muscle weakness and poor balance identified as the two most common modifiable risk factors for falls.

Although NHS rehabilitation services provide strength and balance programmes they are often of limited length so there is a need for effective community-based strength and balance programmes. However, community-based programmes are often underfunded and do not join up to work together.

The Centre for Ageing Better commissioned the University of Manchester’s Healthy Ageing Research Group to bridge the gap between evidence and practice. It looks directly at communities to better understand their local challenges and identify practical examples of doing things differently. Their new report, “Raising the bar on strength and balance” presents the models of delivery, issues, barriers and innovative solutions that support effective community-based programmes.